If you want to ensure that you won’t face overheating, random crashes (resets and the infamous “Blue Screen of Death”) and performance issues with your PC you should check whether it is assembled 100% correctly or not. In this tutorial we will show you where to look for assembling errors on your PC.

Rolling your own computer offers a number of advantages that boxed desktops just can’t match. You get granular control over every single aspect of the hardware. You get to choose not only the nuts-and-bolts-level details like processing and graphical performance, but also deeply personal touches like the PC’s case design and cooling capabilities. There’s no need to settle for a boring black box, unless you want a boring black box.

First, let’s start with the PC assembly itself. The errors describe on this page can overheat your PC thus causing random problems like random resets and crashes (PC “freezing”, “Blue Screen of Death”, etc).

This set of instructions will help you assemble a basic computer capable of running most modern software packages encountered by a casual user. Modern computers become more affordable when users supplement their monetary investment with a few hours of effort. This computer build will be very basic and will be the minimum hardware necessary to have a functional system.

MPORTANT: If you run with, for example, 3 blocks on 1 processor or 3 blocks on 3 processors you will get a different convergence rate due to the default option of -pc_asm_type restrict. Use -pc_asm_type basic to use the standard ASM.

Notes: Each processor can have one or more blocks, but a block cannot be shared by more than one processor. Defaults to one block per processor.